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Full text of "The manufacture and properties of iron and steel"

514
THE IRON" INDUSTRY.
TABLE XXIII-K. Output of Ore and Pig-Iron in Scotland.
Average for period per			Pig Iron.	
y^ar.; tons.		Ayrshire.	Lanarkshire.	Total.
1882 to 1885 Inclusive ........	2,088,652	323.516	738125	1 061 641
1886 to 1890 inclusive ........	1,225,559	296,998	625,218	'922,216
1891 to 1895 inclusive ........	784831	246,758	579 370	826 128
1896 to 1900 inclusive ........	887,471	353.274	774,887	1 128,161
1901 to 1903 inclusive ........	811,260	365,599	867 369	1 232968
				
TABLE XXIII-L. Imports of Iron Ore at Ports in Scotland.
Average for period per year; tons.	Glasgow.	Ardros-sen.	Ayr.	Troon.	Others.	Total.
1882 to 1885 inclusive ........	272000	34,000	14,000	6,000	83,000	409,000
1886 to 1890 inclusive ........	312,000	33,000	42,000	10,000	178,000	575,000
1891 to 1895 inclusive ........	387000	141,000	54,000	32,000	81,000	' 695,000
1896 to 1900 inclusive ........	680,000	422,000	110,000	84,000	98,000	1,394,000
1901 to 1903 inclusive ........	877,000	413,000	99,000	116,000	135,000	1,640,000
						
SEC. XXIIId.—South Wales:
In this district I have included Glamorganshire and the English county of Monmouth. Near by in Gloucestershire is the Forest of Dean., once famous as an iron district, but which, in 1900, produced only 9885 tons of ore, no pig-iron being made in its borders. The iron industry of South Wales was founded on a lean clay band running 30 per cent, in iron. In 1860 the aboye-mentioned counties raised 830,000 tons of ore and in 18YO the amount was a trifle larger. From then the production decreased, being only half as much in 1880, while now it is a negligible quantity. The production of pig-iron has remained stationary from 1860 until now. Before the local ores failed the hematites of the West Coast were brought in, and then by providential dispensation the mines of northern Spain were developed, and from that time South Wales has run exclusively on this imported supply.
In former times the coal from certain districts at works near Merthyr was used directly in the furnace in the same way as in Scotland, but this practice has been discarded and a richer coal is